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The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum Part 5 – With Phil Aynsley

Part five of a tour through the Barber Museum – English and American bikes

Back to Part 1Back to Part 2 – Back to Part 3Back to Part 4


More from the Barber Museum focusing on English and American bikes.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - The American and British collection
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – The American and British collection

Spread over several floors are more “diffuse” themed collections such as ‘the ‘60s’. I’m showing them here based on country of origin.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Matchless G9 twin
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Matchless G9 twin

Matchless G9 twin.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1969 Triumph 750 Trident T150
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Triumph 750 Trident T150

1969 Triumph 750 Trident T150. The first model with Ogle Design “square tank”, “ray-gun” mufflers and drum front brake.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1962 Matchless G-50 CSR
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Matchless G-50 CSR

1962 Matchless G-50 CSR. Built as a homolgation special to get around AMA regulations, the CSR was simply the motor from the G-50 race bike fitted into a street chassis. 25 were built.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1975 Norton 850 Commando Mk3
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Norton 850 Commando Mk3

1975 Norton 850 Commando Mk3.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Early ‘70s Triumph Trident T150 and BSA Rocket 3
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Triumph Trident T150
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Early ‘70s Triumph Trident T150 and BSA Rocket 3
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Triumph Trident T150 and BSA Rocket 3

Early ‘70s Triumph Trident T150 and BSA Rocket 3.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1965 Royal Enfield 250 Continental GT
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Royal Enfield 250 Continental GT

1965 Royal Enfield 250 Continental GT.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1957 Douglas Dragonfly 350
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Douglas Dragonfly 350

1957 Douglas Dragonfly 350.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1951 Triumph Twenty One
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Triumph Twenty One

1951 Triumph Twenty One

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1923 Scott Sprint Special
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Scott Sprint Special

1923 Scott Sprint Special

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1972 Triumph X-75 Hurricane
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Triumph X-75 Hurricane

Possibly the first factory “custom” special was the 1972-3 Triumph X-75 Hurricane. In 1969 the American BSA-Triumph management commissioned Craig Vetter to make the BSA A75 “sleeker and more balanced”.

The resultant bike was sent to the UK the following year, just in time for BSA’s demise. Initially not impressed, the UK management then realised they could now use the many BSA Rocket 3 spare parts on hand. In 1972 the bike entered limited production as the Triumph Hurricane with 1200 constructed, power was 58hp at 7,250rpm.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1969 BSA 750 Rocket 3
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – BSA 750 Rocket 3

1969 BSA 750 Rocket 3.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1990 Norton F1
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Norton F1

1990 Norton F1.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1982 Hesketh V 1000
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1982 Hesketh V 1000

1982 Hesketh V 1000.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1974 Norton Commando 850 JPS
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Norton Commando 850 JPS
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1974 Norton Commando 850 JPS
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Norton Commando 850 JPS

1974 Norton Commando 850 JPS.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1960 BSA Gold Star Clubman
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – BSA Gold Star Clubman

1960 BSA Gold Star Clubman’s.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1977 Dresda Triumph
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Dresda Triumph

1977 Dresda Triumph.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Sunbeam and H-D
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Sunbeam and H-D

1947 Sunbeam S7, 1977 Harley Davidson XLCR.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1954 AJS E95
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1954 AJS E95

It is generally accepted that only four AJS E95s were built back in the early 1950s. You can see half of them here! The E95 was derived from the E90S, a 1946 500cc parallel twin design that featured water-cooling and a supercharger.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1954 AJS E95
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1954 AJS E95

With the banning of forced induction, the bike (now the E90) lost the supercharger and became air-cooled – with the unusual spiked fins on the cylinder heads resulting in the famous “Porcupine” name.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1954 AJS E95
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1954 AJS E95

The E90 was raced from 1947 until it was replaced by the much revised E95 in 1952, on the way becoming the only twin to win the 500cc world championship (in its inaugural year, 1949). The E95’s cylinders were inclined at 45 degrees and a new frame was used but apart from a single victory at its first race in the Swiss GP in 1952, no wins were recorded in ’52-3.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1954 AJS E95
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1954 AJS E95

In 1954 a final revamp brought another, lower frame, a new fuel system to replace the troubled original design and the distinctive pannier-style fuel tank. However continuing unreliability resulted in AJS quitting Grand Prix altogether at the end of the season. 54hp at 7,800rpm (est), was matched to a dry weight of 152kg, and top speed of 230km/h (IoM, 1964).

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1957 Vincent Amanda water scooter
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1957 Vincent Amanda water scooter

1957 Vincent Amanda water scooter. Originally powered by Vincent made 75 and 100cc two-stroke singles, a 200cc twin was later produced. This fibreglass person water craft was well ahead of its time but only some 2000 were sold up until 1959. The 75cc version had a top speed of 8km/h, the 100cc 11kph and the 200cc about 30km/h.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1957 Vincent Amanda water scooter
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1957 Vincent Amanda water scooter

While the two smaller models were fairly problem free the twin output considerably more engine/exhaust heat than anticipated which caused the surrounding fibreglass hull to loose its structural strength!

This was rectified but the unfortunate drowning of a Vincent engineer while testing an Amanda, together with the entire sales team from Aero Marine (the company that came to Vincent with the original concept) being killed in a plane crash proved to be blows that the project didn’t recover from.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - A mid-1950s Farmfitters Rapier lawnmower
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – A mid-1950s Farmfitters Rapier lawnmower
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - A mid-1950s Farmfitters Rapier lawnmower
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – A mid-1950s Farmfitters Rapier lawnmower

A mid-1950s Farmfitters Rapier lawnmower – powered by a Vincent industrial two-stroke motor, previously owned by John Surtees.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1970 Indian Velocette
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1970 Indian Velocette

1970 Clymer Indian and 1970 Indian Velocette.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1959 Zimmerman 250
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1959 Zimmerman 250
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1959 Zimmerman 250
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1959 Zimmerman 250

The V-twin engine was designed, cast and machined by model builder Emil Zimmerman. It featured a ported, gear-driven rotary sleeve valve system. A modified Zundapp chassis was used. It was ridden competitively in the Jack Pine Enduro. This is the only example thought to exist. Dry weight was 140kg and top speed 152km/h.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1952 Harley Davidson Model K Sport.
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Harley Davidson Model K Sport.

Front to rear: 1955 Harley Davidson KHK. 1952 Harley Davidson Model K Sport.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1950 Indian Chief
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1950 Indian Chief

1950 Indian Chief ‘bagger’ panniers.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1910 Pierce Four
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1910 Pierce Four

In 1909 Pierce Four became the first four cylinder motorcycle made in the US. Headed by the son of the Pierce car company, the Pierce Cycle Company’s Four was derived from the Belgian F.N., one of which Percy Pierce brought back from Europe.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1910 Pierce Four
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1910 Pierce Four

However the 688cc engine was improved with a side-valve T head which made a top speed of 100km/h possible. The substantial 3.5 inch tube frame housed both fuel and oil. This 1910 model used a two-speed transmission as opposed to the early model’s single speed.

Final drive was by shaft, the extremely high initial selling price of $325, which was later raised to $400, wasn’t enough to cover the high cost of manufacture and the company folded in 1914. Less than 15 Fours are known to have survived.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - The Buell section
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – The Buell section

Left to right: 1992 Buell RSS 1200 Westwind. 1986 Buell RR 1000. 1988 Buell RR 1200.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 2007 Buell XB RR and 2012 EBR 1190RS
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 2007 Buell XB RR and 2012 EBR 1190RS

2007 Buell XB RR and 2012 EBR 1190RS.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1948 Marman/Scwinn
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Marman/Scwinn

Marman Products Co. was founded in 1948 by Herbert “Zeppo” Marx, the youngest of the Marx brothers. After appearing in the first five Marx brothers movies he went on to become a talented engineer, designing among other things the “Marman clamps” used to hold the ‘Fat Man’ atomic bomb inside the B29 aircraft.

The clamps are used to this day in aircraft fuel systems and spaceflight systems. In 1948 he added surplus engines from WWII drones to Schwinn bicycles (including a clutch) to provide this lively ride.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1919 Johnson Motor Wheel
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – 1919 Johnson Motor Wheel

1919 Johnson Motor Wheel. While there were numerous “clip-on” motors and motor wheels developed in the early part of the 20th century, not many used a twin cylinder engine!

This 1919 Johnson Motor Wheel could be attached to any 26 inch bicycle and included all the parts, fittings and cables including the innovative sprocket hub which incorporated a shock absorber.

The horizontally opposed 154cc two-stroke twin made 3-4hp which enabled a top speed of 50km/h and over 17,000 were built.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1938 Crocker
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Crocker

1938 Crocker.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1940 Indian Four
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Indian Four

1940 Indian Four.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 1969 “Captain America” Harley Davidson chopper replica
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – “Captain America” Harley-Davidson replica

1969 “Captain America” Harley-Davidson chopper replica.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - 2007 “Shop Rat” custom
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – “Shop Rat” custom

2007 “Shop Rat” custom.