The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum Part 7 – With Phil Aynsley

The seventh and final part of a tour through the Barber Museum – Japanese machinery

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The final installment from the Barber Museum – mostly Japanese bikes this time. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tour of the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum, it’s certainly worth a visit in person if you can ever manage it.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Japanese machinery

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Japanese machinery

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Japanese machinery

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Japanese machinery

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Japanese machinery

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda 145 Dream E

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Japanese machinery

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda 145 Dream E

1953 Honda 145 Dream E
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda Cub F 58cc

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda Cub F 58cc

Honda Cub F 58cc. Honda Benly J 125cc
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Showa Cruiser 250

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Showa Cruiser 250

1957 Showa Cruiser 250. Far better known for their suspension components, Showa also produced this complete bike, the Cruiser, in 1957.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Showa Cruiser 250

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Showa Cruiser 250

The 246cc two-stroke single used an Amal carb, made 10hp at 5500rpm, weighed 150kg and had a top speed of 100km/h. Like the majority of middle weight Japanese bikes of the period it was greatly influenced by contemporary German designs.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Lilac CF 40

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Lilac CF 40

1959 Lilac CF 40. Marusho started constructing shaft drive four-stroke singles, and later flat twins, in 1951 –  mostly under the Lilac name. In 1959 the first of the V-twins appeared, the 247cc Lilac LS-18. This 66 degree design was obviously heavily influenced by the German V35 Bergmeister but featured an electric starter.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Lilac CF 40

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Lilac CF 40

Many thousands of V-twin Lilacs were produced over the years across many models. This is a 125cc CF-40 from 1961 (as evidenced by the heavily finned heads) which made 10.5hp and was good for about 110km/h. All Lilac V-twins had the same 66 degree cylinder angle apart from the C-81/C82 125/150cc models that used a 90 degree design.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Marusho Magnum 500

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Marusho Magnum 500

1953 Marusho Magnum 500 and BMW inspiration
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Bridgestone 175 Dual Twin Scrambler

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Bridgestone 175 Dual Twin Scrambler

1969 Bridgestone 175 Dual Twin Scrambler
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda CB750

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda CB750

1969 Honda CB750
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda CB550

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda CB500 Four

1974 Honda CB550
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda CB400F

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda CB400F

1976 Honda CB400F
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Suzuki T500

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Suzuki T500

1972 Suzuki T500
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki H1 Mach III 500

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki H1 Mach III 500

1969 Kawasaki H1 Mach III 500
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki S2 Mach II 350

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki S2 Mach II 350

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki S2 Mach II 350

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki S2 Mach II 350

1972 Kawasaki S2 Mach II 350
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - The rise of the off road motorcycle

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – The rise of the off road motorcycle

The rise of the off road motorcycle. Left to right: 1963 Parilla 250 Wildcat. 1965 Ducati 250 Scrambler. 1968 Yamaha DT-1 250. 1970 Honda SL175. 1974 Alouette AX175. 1974 Hodaka 125 Combat Wombat.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Alouette AX175

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Alouette AX175

1974 Alouette AX175. Not your usual dirt bike, the Alouette AX-125 was produced by the Canadian snowmobile manufacturer of the same name. The company needed a non snowmobile product to keep the assembly lines and dealers busy during the summer months so introduced the AX in 1973.

It was powered by a Sachs 125cc motor but combined with steel rims, fibre glass bodywork, average suspension and even more average looks it was not a success with only around 800 sold.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Yamaha DT-1 250

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Yamaha DT-1 250

1968 Yamaha DT-1 250
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda SL175

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda SL175

1970 Honda SL175
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda RS750D

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda RS750D

1984 Honda RS750D
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - The full house of Japanese turbos from the early ‘80s

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – The full house of Japanese turbos from the early ‘80s

The full house of Japanese turbos from the early ‘80s. The 1985 Kawasaki 750 Turbo (112hp at 9,000rpm, 252kg), 1982 Yamaha XJ 650 Turbo Seca (85hp at 8,700rpm, 250kg), 1983 Honda CX 650 TD (100hp at 8,000rpm, 234kg), 1983 Suzuki XN 85 D (85hp at 8,500rpm, 230kg).

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - The full house of Japanese turbos from the early ‘80s

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – The full house of Japanese turbos from the early ‘80s

While the 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC was the first production turbo powered bike, things didn’t really start to heat up in this segment of the market until the release of the Honda CX 500 TC (on display elsewhere in the museum) and the Yamaha in 1982. Suzuki and finally Kawasaki (again) followed.

However all the bikes suffered from varying degrees of turbo lag, complexity and excess weight compared to normally aspirated models. As a result these bikes were only produced for one or two years before the short lived turbo era ran out of puff.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda CBX1000

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda CBX1000

1979 Honda CBX1000
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki 900 Z1A

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki 900 Z1A

1974 Kawasaki 900 Z1A
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Suzuki line-up

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Suzuki line-up

Left to right: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 1100. 1979 Suzuki GS 1000S. 1989 Suzuki RGV 250
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Sportsbikes of the '80s

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Sportsbikes of the ’80s

‘80s Sportsbikes. Left top to bottom: 1989 Honda RC30. 1989 Ducati 851 Strada. 1990 Gilera SP-01.
Centre top to bottom: 1983 Honda CB1100R. 1989 Yamaha FZR750 – OW01
Right top to bottom: 1990 Honda VFR400R – NC30. 1985 Ducati Mille S2. 1982 Suzuki GS1000S Katana
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Ducati Mille S2, Suzuki GS1000S Katana

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Ducati Mille S2, Suzuki GS1000S Katana

1985 Ducati Mille S2. 1982 Suzuki GS1000S Katana
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda CB1100R

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda CB1100R

1983 Honda CB1100R
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda VFs

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda VFs

Front to rear: 1986 Honda VF500F. 1986 Honda VF1000R.
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Yamaha GTS1000

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Yamaha GTS1000

1993 Yamaha GTS1000. The GTS1000 was not a commercial success despite working quite well. The James Parker RADD front suspension was not hub-centre steering but a steered upright design instead.

The bike used a detuned FZR1000 EXUP motor housed in a completely unique “Omega” alloy chassis. While poor sales meant the bike was withdrawn from sale in the US in 1994 it continued to be sold in Europe until 1999. 102hp at 9000rpm. Top speed 227km/h.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Honda NR750

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Honda NR750

1997 Honda NR750
The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki Z1 based 2300cc V12

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki Z1 based 2300cc V12

As a nuclear research engineer, Briton Allen Millyard is used to dealing with heavy metals. After producing four and five cylinder Kawasaki two-strokes, Allen moved on to the Kawasaki Z1 based 1600cc V-8 and Z1300 based 2300cc V-12 seen here.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki Z1 based 1600cc V8

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki Z1 based 1600cc V8

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum - Kawasaki Z1 based 1600cc V8

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – Kawasaki Z1 based 1600cc V8

Both look amazingly like production machines which tends to hide the extraordinary level of engineering detail involved. The V-8 makes approximately 130hp at 8,000rpm, while the V-12 approaches 260hp!


The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum Part 7 – With Phil Aynsley

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