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Suzuki GSX250R Motorcycle Test

Sporty 250 option from Suzuki

Words by Stuart, Images by Nick Wood


Attracting attention on this metallic blue version of the GSX250R is something you’ll have to get used to. Most of the people who talked to me about the little fun machine thought it was a 500 or larger. When I mentioned that it is a 250, some turned up their noses, others were still grinning and were even more interested in what this bike has to offer.

Suzuki have finally introduced a sportsbike offering into their LAMS lineup - a 250cc twin-cylinder
Suzuki have finally introduced a sportsbike offering into their LAMS lineup – a 250cc twin-cylinder

What it does offer is a 248cc parallel twin based on the Inazuma engine, but much less ‘vibey’ than the Inazuma was. In fact the GSX250R engine is one of the smoothest parallel twins I’ve ridden. Suzuki claims it is to do with the cam profile which also helps suppress engine noise.

The powerplant is a 248cc parallel twin based on the Inazuma
The powerplant is a 248cc parallel twin based on the Inazuma with a strong low-end

The engine is designed for low-to-midrange torque and while it gets away from a standstill okay and is easy to ride, it does get a little exhausted for a bike of this capacity from the mid-range on. I don’t understand why Suzuki didn’t make this bike a 300 or even a 400 to compete with the mega popular Ninja 300 (soon to be Ninja 400) and Yamaha R3.

The handling of little, light bikes like this is normally quite fast on turn in. When I first jumped on the GSX and ripped into some well-known corners I was surprised that I needed to use a little more muscle than normally required for little bikes. It was not a problem, just that I had to get used to the tiny bit slower steering.

The GSX250R also features neutral handling ideal for a new rider
The GSX250R also features neutral handling ideal for a new rider

In fact I came to enjoy the more neutral turn in, which also includes great stability over on the edge of the tyre. For those bigger riders a little more rear preload would be advisable, and that’s easily adjusted.

The single disc front brake would be the only downfall on this fun machine. It lacks power and feel and to improve it would hopefully only require a set of better brake pads, but a different ratio master cylinder could also be called for. There is ABS to help if things get right out of control, but I couldn’t even activate it on the front due to the lack of power.

A single front disc brake is on the limiting side
A single front disc brake is on the limiting side but backed up by ABS

Ergonomics are well suited to most sized riders. A low 790mm seat height with the front of the seat being slim means that even those with really short legs can place a foot down at a standstill. Comfort isn’t a selling point, but the seat to peg height is good, as is the just weighted wrists of the clip-on handlebars position.

Styling is a strong point on the GSX250R in the ECSTAR livery
Styling is a strong point on the GSX250R in the ECSTAR livery

Suzuki understands that motorcycle styling is important for their models, especially for entry level riders who want their machine to stand out from the crowd. Suzuki’s styling designers have created a sporty and aggressive look with a futuristic flair which should help get many bums on seats. This is carried through with the classy LEDs for the position lamps up front and the tail light.

LCD instruments are easy to read with plentiful information
LCD instruments are easy to read with plentiful information

Adding to the sporty styling are the multi-function full LCD instruments. Integrated into the fairing which makes some more expensive bikes’ instruments look cheap they come with all the usual features including a programmable engine-RPM indicator light (shift light), bright segmented-bar tachometer across the top, digital speedometer, gear position indicator, digital clock, dual trip meters, average fuel consumption meters, fuel gauge and an oil change timing indicator.

Accessories will be a limiting factor on the GSX250R at this point, but that may change
Accessories will be a limiting factor on the GSX250R at this point, but that may change

Unfortunately there are no genuine Suzuki accessories available for the GSX250R, apart from a generic Suzuki cover. If you want to change anything, you’ll need to look at the aftermarket.

The new Suzuki GSX250R is a good choice for a wide range of riders. This includes those who are looking to buy their first sports street bike, or who are returning to the world of two-wheeled riding pleasure later in life and want something simple and easy to manage.


The GSX250R is an ideal beginners option for $5790 RRP on-road
The GSX250R is an ideal beginners option for $5790 RRP on-road

Suzuki GSX250R Specifications

  • Price – $5790
  • Warranty – Two years, unlimited distance
  • Servicing Intervals – Every 12,000km or 12 months
  • Engine – Liquid-cooled parallel twin cylinder, 4-stroke, SOHC, 2 valves per cylinder
  • Bore x Stroke – 53.5 x 55.2mm
  • Displacement – 248cc
  • Compression – 11.5:1
  • Power – 17.5kW @ 8500rpm
  • Torque – 22Nm @ 6500rpm
  • Transmission – Six-speed, wet multi-plate clutch, chain final drive
  • Suspension – Front, telescopic fork, non-adjustable, travel 115mm. Rear, monoshock, adjustable preload, travel 125mm.
  • DIMENSIONS
    • Seat height – 790mm
    • Weight – 181kg (wet)
    • Fuel capacity – 15 litres
    • Wheelbase – 1430mm
  • Tyres – Front, 110/80/17. Rear, 140/55/17
  • Frame – Semi double cradle
  • Brakes – Front, 290mm disc with dual-piston ABS caliper. Rear, 240mm disc, single-piston ABS caliper
  • Fuel Consumption – 4.09 litres per 100km, premium unleaded
  • Theoretical Range – 366km
  • Colours – Pearl Black, Metallic Triton Blue
  • Verdict – Fun and stylish GP replica
  • Manufacturer Website – www.suzukimotorcycles.com.au (Suzuki Motorcycles Australia)

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