Cor Dees’ Laverda Museum

With Phil Aynsley


Cor Dees is a Dutchman with a serious Laverda addiction! He bought his first Laverda in 1988 and, as can be seen, added the odd one or two after that.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

He constructed this purpose built building in Lisse which opened in 2006 and I photographed there in 2015.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Unfortunately, due to ill health, it had to be closed in 2017 and the collection has since been sold. Thus it was lucky that I was there to shoot these bikes well before then, and can now present this incredible collection here for your enjoyment.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum was put together by Cor Dees

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – Unfortunately due to ill health it was closed

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – The collection was later sold off

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – 81 models were featured alongside extensive memorabilia

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – Dees started collecting in ’88 but quickly became addicted to the iconic Italian brand

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – Dees built a close relation with the Laverda family

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Cor built up a close relationship with the Laverda family and was able, with the help of the late Massimo Laverda, to obtain the remaining spare parts and two incomplete V6 prototypes as well as vast quantities of period advertising material, film, documentation and other memorabilia. In all some 81 bikes, scooters and mopeds comprised the collection, covering the years from 1950 to 2000.

LaverdaMuseum
This was the original Laverda sign over the factory and weighs in at 400kg

This is the 400kg marble sign that hung over the entrance to the Laverda factory from 1952 until the building was demolished in 2000.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – The collection included a number of race machines

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – Including the brand’s V6

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – The 1000cc V6 (closest)

The line up of race bikes includes the legendary 1000cc V6 (link), one of the three 1000cc space-frame triple endurance machines, the ’75 750 SFC that won the Belgian Championship and the company’s only GP bike – the ’87 125cc prototype (link).

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – An original Laverda drawing board

One of the original drafting boards.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Laverda manufactured a wide range of agricultural equipment from their founding in 1873, such as this press.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda name is actually used to continue to produce heavy farm machinery to this day

While no longer in family hands, the Laverda company still makes tractors and other heavy farm machinery.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – Scooters

There is a wide range of memorabilia on display. Also a neat 200cc twin and several scooter models.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – A 750 GTL in police get-up

The Police version of the 750 GTL.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – 1971 1000cc triple prototype

This is most likely the 1000cc triple prototype bike that Laverda displayed at the Milan Show in 1971.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – A 1981 RGS 1000 in touring form

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

A 1981 RGS 1000 fitted with the saddlebags and fairing from the later Executive model.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Laverda is hardly known for its off road models but the company produced quite a number over the years. Here a 600 Atlas (left) and a 250 Chott (right) find themselves above the Husqvarna powered LH3 (125cc) and LH4 (250cc).

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – The company also produced off-road machines

The 250TR Chott, ISDE version.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

A line up of early bikes.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

The Navarro was released in 1990 as the update to the Lesmo. The bodywork was more encompassing, the wheels 17 inch and disc brakes fitted front and rear. The 125cc 2-stroke was the same motor fitted to the Cagiva Freccia C12R. Only a few hundred were sold due to the combination of somewhat dated specification and high price. Power was 29 hp at 10,300 rpm, with a dry weight of 115 kg.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – A 650 vertical twin on the right

The first of the “new” vertical twins was the 650 which was introduced in May 1968 (link) before quickly being superseded by the 750. Somewhere between 50 and 200 were built.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – 750GT in blue

The 1000 prototype with a 750GT.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – A 1971 Laverda 750 SF1

Ducati 999 | Leon Haslam’s BSB Ducati 999 Racer

Ducati 999 Leon Haslam's 2006-2007 BSB Ducati 999While the Ducati 999 was not highly regarded in the marketplace (due entirely to its looks, not performance),...

The Moto Guzzi V 1000 I-Convert

Moto Guzzi V 1000 I-Convert With Phil AynsleyWhen it launched in 1975 the Moto Guzzi V 1000 I-Convert became the first production motorcycle fitted with...